Can My Dog’s Heart Murmur Lead To Congestive Heart Failure?

Can My Dog’s Heart Murmur Lead To Congestive Heart Failure?

Answered by Dr. Jean Hofve

Well, heart murmurs are just a sign of turbulence in the blood flow of the heart where there should be smooth, quiet flow. But, a heart murmur is nearly a symptom and not a cause of disease or a disease by itself. In puppies, murmurs are very common. Most of them are innocent murmurs and don’t mean anything in terms of heart function. Most puppies will outgrow them. 

In giant breed dogs in particular though, heart murmurs can be an early sign of heart disease. If there is backward flow through one of the valves, that causes the turbulence that your veterinarian can hear through the stethoscope. That can be an early warning sign of a more serious disease. 

The best way to know what’s going on in your dog’s heart, whether it’s something you need to worry about and needs treatment, or whether it’s just a minor little something that your dog isn’t going to have any problems with, is through echocardiography. An echo is a form of ultrasound, and it looks at the heart in real-time. It can detect turbulence within the heart and discover where it’s coming from as well as whether it’s something to be worried about or not. So when in doubt, echocardiography is your best bet. 

Hi! I’m Doctor Jean Hofve, a licensed veterinarian with HolisticActions!. Thanks, I hope this helps! Take care. 

Suggested Treatments: 

  1. Early detection through vet exam and echocardiography
  2. Treating underlining condition (it could be hypothyroidism, heartworm, anemia, or heart defect)
  3. Monitoring

Related Symptoms:

  1. Murmur detected through the stethoscope
  2. If you see symptoms like coughing, congestion, change in breath sounds or rapid breathingexercise intolerance, weakness or “fainting,” gray or blue gums – seek medical attention.

DISCLAIMER: Holistic Actions! does not provide advice on certified medical treatments. Content is intended for informational purposes only and to equip you with the tools needed for Holistic Medical Decision Making (HMDM). It is not a substitute for clinical assessment, diagnosis, or treatment. Never use content found on the Holistic Actions! website as the basis for ignoring advice from your veterinarian to seek treatment. If you think you may have a veterinary emergency, please call your vet or an animal hospital immediately.

 

dr.jean hofve, holistic pet care

Dr. Jean

Holistic veterinarian and author Dr. Jean Hofve has more than 20 years’ experience in integrative veterinary medicine. She has a passion for feline health and nutrition, and has intensively studied and researched pet nutrition and the pet food industry since the early 1990s.

She has written books,  dozens of articles and been interviewed for print, radio, and television around the world. She is an advisor to AAFCO, the organization that sets standards for pet food production, and founder of Spirit Essences (now owned and operated by Jackson Galaxy), which makes flower essence remedies for many animal health and behavior problems. 

Can You Spay a Pregnant Cat?

Can You Spay a Pregnant Cat?

Answered by Dr. Jean Hofve

So your girl kitty accidentally got pregnant. Now what? Is it too late to spay her? No, in most cases, it isn’t too late most cats can be spayed during pregnancy—unless the pregnancy is very advanced. 

Sometimes if it’s very advanced. For example the cat I had on my operating table with a kitten poking its nose out. Obviously, we did not spay her and the kittens were born under my desk. But if that’s the case where you can’t spay a pregnant cat. But unless it’s very advanced and the chance of increased blood loss is too much, you can spay a cat. Pretty much anytime it’s in the 63 days of pregnancy, so don’t worry. 

I’m Dr. Jean Hofve, a licensed veterinarian with HolisticActions!. Take care, bye bye.

DISCLAIMER: Holistic Actions! does not provide advice on certified medical treatments. Content is intended for informational purposes only and to equip you with the tools needed for Holistic Medical Decision Making (HMDM). It is not a substitute for clinical assessment, diagnosis, or treatment. Never use content found on the Holistic Actions! website as the basis for ignoring advice from your veterinarian to seek treatment. If you think you may have a veterinary emergency, please call your vet or an animal hospital immediately.

 

dr.jean hofve, holistic pet care

Dr. Jean

Holistic veterinarian and author Dr. Jean Hofve has more than 20 years’ experience in integrative veterinary medicine. She has a passion for feline health and nutrition, and has intensively studied and researched pet nutrition and the pet food industry since the early 1990s.

She has written books,  dozens of articles and been interviewed for print, radio, and television around the world. She is an advisor to AAFCO, the organization that sets standards for pet food production, and founder of Spirit Essences (now owned and operated by Jackson Galaxy), which makes flower essence remedies for many animal health and behavior problems. 

How Do Cats Get Heartworms?

How Do Cats Get Heartworms?

Answered by Dr. Jean Hofve

Did you know that cats, like dogs, can get heartworms? Heartworms are transmitted by the bite of an infected mosquito, so cats can get it, although it is very rare in kitties. The main symptom of heartworm disease in cats is coughing, although a cat may not present any symptoms at all. 

Mosquitos can breed in a very small amount of water. Just a few drops is enough, so preventing heartworm involves preventing mosquitos. That means removing all standing water in your yard, keeping door and window screens in good repair, keeping cats indoors as much as possible, or at the very least, keeping them instead from dusk til dawn when mosquitos are most active. There are topical sprays, herbal sprays, that can be used on cats, but they must be reapplied about every 2 hours, so it may not be totally practical. Also, some of the products on the market are not entirely safe for cats because they use very strong herbs and spices, so be sure to talk to your holistic veterinarian about which ones are safe to use on your cat. 

Hi, I’m doctor Jean Hofve, licensed veterinarian with HolisticActions!.com. Thanks very much. 

Suggested Treatments: 

  1. Prevention by preventing mosquitos on your property
  2. Topical sprays

Related Symptoms: 

  1.  No symptoms (positive blood test results)
  2. Coughing
  3. Vomiting/weight loss

    DISCLAIMER: Holistic Actions! does not provide advice on certified medical treatments. Content is intended for informational purposes only and to equip you with the tools needed for Holistic Medical Decision Making (HMDM). It is not a substitute for clinical assessment, diagnosis, or treatment. Never use content found on the Holistic Actions! website as the basis for ignoring advice from your veterinarian to seek treatment. If you think you may have a veterinary emergency, please call your vet or an animal hospital immediately.

     

    dr.jean hofve, holistic pet care

    Dr. Jean

    Holistic veterinarian and author Dr. Jean Hofve has more than 20 years’ experience in integrative veterinary medicine. She has a passion for feline health and nutrition, and has intensively studied and researched pet nutrition and the pet food industry since the early 1990s.

    She has written books,  dozens of articles and been interviewed for print, radio, and television around the world. She is an advisor to AAFCO, the organization that sets standards for pet food production, and founder of Spirit Essences (now owned and operated by Jackson Galaxy), which makes flower essence remedies for many animal health and behavior problems. 

    What Natural Methods Can I Use to Help My Cat’s Anxiety?

    What Natural Methods Can I Use to Help My Cat’s Anxiety?

    Answered by Dr. Jean Hofve

    Natural therapies are very effective for reducing cat anxiety. Flower Essences are one of the very best remedies to use for stressed and anxious kitties. Rescue Remedy or Stress Stopper from Jackson Galaxy Solutions are both really good for those stressed-out kitties. There are also calming herbs that can be used such as passionflower, valerian, and chamomile. There are many combination herbal products on the market made specifically for cats. 

    There is a product called Composure made by Vetriscience that contains nutrients that are beneficial and help calm animals down. Finally, I recommend play therapy. Play therapy you say? Yeah! That’s just a fancy name for interactive play with you on one end of a cat toy and the cat on the other. Play therapy satisfies a cat’s strong hunter instincts, it increases their territorial confidence and it can help dissipate some of that nervous energy. It will also help you both sleep well at night and it’s fun to boot.

    Hi, I’m Dr. Jean Hofve, a licensed veterinarian with HolisticActions!. I hope this helps. Thanks, bye-bye.

    Suggested Treatments: 

    1. Rescue Remedy or Stress Stopper from Jackson Galaxy Solutions
    2. Calming herbs, such as passionflower, valerian, and chamomile
    3. Composure made by Vetriscience
    4. Play therapy

    Related Symptoms: 

    1. Insomnia
    2. Over or under grooming
    3. Hiding
    4. Agression
    5. Litter box accidents

        DISCLAIMER: Holistic Actions! does not provide advice on certified medical treatments. Content is intended for informational purposes only and to equip you with the tools needed for Holistic Medical Decision Making (HMDM). It is not a substitute for clinical assessment, diagnosis, or treatment. Never use content found on the Holistic Actions! website as the basis for ignoring advice from your veterinarian to seek treatment. If you think you may have a veterinary emergency, please call your vet or an animal hospital immediately.

         

        dr.jean hofve, holistic pet care

        Dr. Jean

        Holistic veterinarian and author Dr. Jean Hofve has more than 20 years’ experience in integrative veterinary medicine. She has a passion for feline health and nutrition, and has intensively studied and researched pet nutrition and the pet food industry since the early 1990s.

        She has written books,  dozens of articles and been interviewed for print, radio, and television around the world. She is an advisor to AAFCO, the organization that sets standards for pet food production, and founder of Spirit Essences (now owned and operated by Jackson Galaxy), which makes flower essence remedies for many animal health and behavior problems. 

        Are There Treatment Options For Cushing’s Disease?

        Are There Treatment Options For Cushing’s Disease?

        Answered by Dr. Jeff Feinman

        I love that question because that’s kind of what the second step of HMDM, or Holistic Medical Decision Making, is all about. Do research for holistic and conventional options, and then decide what to do in step 3 of HMDM

        The most common treatment is no treatment, but monitoring because there’s no “quality of life” altering symptoms. So, the vet might just opt to do a blood test every 6 months or go in if there are any problems. Other treatments include Lysodren which actually destroys part of the adrenal gland that makes steroid hormones that we see in Cushing’s Disease. Lysodren is an EDT derivative that is pretty toxic, so it’s been replaced pretty much with another safer medication called Vetoryl, which will reduce the signs of Cushing’s Disease. It may not have the same long-lasting effect of Lysodren, but in my experience and at my practice, we try to alter lifestyle, hygienic and homeopathic before going to medications. 

        So there are a lot of lifestyle factors that you can modify from diet to things like post electromagnetic frequency (PEMF) and acupuncture. These things are verified to work to increase quality of life and decrease symptoms. We’ll talk further about that in future videos.

        I’m Jeff Feinman, licensed holistic veterinarian here in Weston, Connecticut to answer common pet parent questions. Thank you for watching and we’ll all talk soon!

        Learn more about holistic pet care at HolisticActions!

        Suggested Treatments: 

        1. Conventional care is drugs that destroy adrenal cells or ones that modify adrenal home levels
        2. Physiologically supporting with supplements
        3. Energetically curing with homeopathy-which is a way of approaching symptoms in a totally different way

        Related Symptoms:

        1. Most common is often no obvious symptoms (Cushing’s detected on a routine blood test).
        2. Increased thirst
        3. Panting and potbellied

            DISCLAIMER: Holistic Actions! does not provide advice on certified medical treatments. Content is intended for informational purposes only and to equip you with the tools needed for Holistic Medical Decision Making (HMDM). It is not a substitute for clinical assessment, diagnosis, or treatment. Never use content found on the Holistic Actions! website as the basis for ignoring advice from your veterinarian to seek treatment. If you think you may have a veterinary emergency, please call your vet or an animal hospital immediately.

             

            Dr. Jeff

            Jeffrey Feinman, BA, VMD, CVH, graduated in 1985 from the University of Pennsylvania and was Penn’s first veterinary dual-degree University Scholar, holding both molecular biology and veterinary degrees. He is the founder of HolisticActions.com and dedicated to pet parent empowerment.

            Dr. Jeff is devoted to researching about how to harness the innate power of the individual using Vitality and Balance. He and his wonderful wife Amy live with Archie, a rescue pup, and a Rex cat named Tigger.

            What are the Symptoms of Cushing’s Disease?

            What are the Symptoms of Cushing’s Disease?

            Answered by Dr. Jeff Feinman

            The most common symptom of Cushing’s is actually not anything that you can see, but what the vet finds in a routine blood test and that’s the elevation in an enzyme called alkaline phosphatase which means that things are changing in the body. As far as external symptoms, the most common symptoms you’ll see are eating a lot, drinking a lot, urinating a lot, and a decrease in their hair coat. It could be almost any physical symptom that you see. 

            If you know the BEAM: Behavior, Energy, Appetite, Mood. How that is often your earliest clue that something is going on. What I’d say is it doesn’t really matter if it’s an internal symptom from a blood test or an external symptom, you need to start dealing with the internal physiological imbalance right away.

            I’m Jeff Feinman, a licensed holistic veterinarian here in Western Connecticut with HolisticActions!, here to answer the most common pet parent questions. Thank you for joining me today!

            Suggested Treatments: 

            1. Conventional care is drugs that destroy adrenal cells or ones that modify adrenal home levels 
            2. Physiologically supporting with supplements
            3. Energetically curing with homeopathy-which is a way of approaching symptoms in a totally different way

            Related Symptoms: 

            1. Most common is often no obvious symptoms (Cushing’s detected on a routine blood test).
            2. Increased thirst
            3. Panting and potbellied

              DISCLAIMER: Holistic Actions! does not provide advice on certified medical treatments. Content is intended for informational purposes only and to equip you with the tools needed for Holistic Medical Decision Making (HMDM). It is not a substitute for clinical assessment, diagnosis, or treatment. Never use content found on the Holistic Actions! website as the basis for ignoring advice from your veterinarian to seek treatment. If you think you may have a veterinary emergency, please call your vet or an animal hospital immediately.

               

              Dr. Jeff

              Jeffrey Feinman, BA, VMD, CVH, graduated in 1985 from the University of Pennsylvania and was Penn’s first veterinary dual-degree University Scholar, holding both molecular biology and veterinary degrees. He is the founder of HolisticActions.com and dedicated to pet parent empowerment.

              Dr. Jeff is devoted to researching about how to harness the innate power of the individual using Vitality and Balance. He and his wonderful wife Amy live with Archie, a rescue pup, and a Rex cat named Tigger.

              What Ingredients Are Important to Incorporate into My Cat’s Diet?

              What Ingredients Are Important to Incorporate into My Cat’s Diet?

              Answered by Dr. Jean Hofve

              There are three ingredients that I recommend you incorporate into your cat’s diet. The first and most important are omega 3 fatty acids, EPA, and DHA. These come from Marine sources such as fish or green-lipped mussels. The other two are beneficial for the digestive system and they are probiotics and prebiotics. Probiotics are the friendly bacteria that live in your cat’s gut. They help digest food, produce vitamins, and prevent infection by pathogenic organisms. Prebiotics are special types of fiber that particularly nourish the gut bacteria including the probiotics that you just gave your cat, so, it’s the match made in heaven.

               I hope this helps! I’m Dr. Jean Hofve, a licensed veterinarian with Holistic Actions!. Take care, bye-bye.

              Suggested Treatments/ingredients in your cat’s diet: 

              1. Omega 3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA)
              2. Probiotics
              3. Prebiotics

              Related Symptoms when those ingredients are lacking: 

              1. Dry/flaky coat
              2. Digestive disorders
              3. Allergies

                DISCLAIMER: Holistic Actions! does not provide advice on certified medical treatments. Content is intended for informational purposes only and to equip you with the tools needed for Holistic Medical Decision Making (HMDM). It is not a substitute for clinical assessment, diagnosis, or treatment. Never use content found on the Holistic Actions! website as the basis for ignoring advice from your veterinarian to seek treatment. If you think you may have a veterinary emergency, please call your vet or an animal hospital immediately.

                 

                dr.jean hofve, holistic pet care

                Dr. Jean

                Holistic veterinarian and author Dr. Jean Hofve has more than 20 years’ experience in integrative veterinary medicine. She has a passion for feline health and nutrition, and has intensively studied and researched pet nutrition and the pet food industry since the early 1990s.

                She has written books,  dozens of articles and been interviewed for print, radio, and television around the world. She is an advisor to AAFCO, the organization that sets standards for pet food production, and founder of Spirit Essences (now owned and operated by Jackson Galaxy), which makes flower essence remedies for many animal health and behavior problems. 

                What Homeopathic Remedy Can Treat a Cat’s Mouth Tumor?

                What Homeopathic Remedy Can Treat a Cat’s Mouth Tumor?

                 

                Answered by Dr. Christina Chambreau:

                First, you have to understand that homeopathy is an individualized medicine. That’s the only way it can work in its most brilliant, effective way. Individual cases show that it  is possible with good homeopathic prescribing to resolve mouth cancer in a cat. 

                All of the symptoms that your cat has now, not just the mouth cancer, and has always had in the past are carefully evaluated and compared to the testing that was done on  thousands of homeopathic remedies and written up in books. We compare the symptoms of your cat so we’re individualizing the choice of medicine with those remedies that were tested to find the one that most closely fits your cat. And then equally important as the selection of which remedy is following up to see how is your cat responding to that treatment. 

                The tumor is not going to just magically go away overnight, so you have to evaluate all of the symptoms very carefully to know whether it is time for a new homeopathic remedy or to stick with this one and change the frequency or quantity of dosage. So it’s a very individualized medicine. Unfortunately, there is no one answer for that question.

                This is Dr. Christina Chambreau, a licensed veterinarian at Holistic Actions!, answering your common pet parent questions. Have a great day!

                Suggested Treatments: 

                1. Individualized homeopathic remedy
                2. Fresh food nutrition
                3. Mushrooms

                Related Symptoms: 

                1. Pain
                2. Trouble eating
                3. Increased saliva

                DISCLAIMER: Holistic Actions! does not provide advice on certified medical treatments. Content is intended for informational purposes only and to equip you with the tools needed for Holistic Medical Decision Making (HMDM). It is not a substitute for clinical assessment, diagnosis, or treatment. Never use content found on the Holistic Actions! website as the basis for ignoring advice from your veterinarian to seek treatment. If you think you may have a veterinary emergency, please call your vet or an animal hospital immediately.

                 

                Dr. Christina

                Christina Chambreau, DVM, is an internationally known homeopathic veterinarian and associate editor of the Integrative Veterinary Care Journal, she’s written several books on animal healthcare. 

                After opening her own homeopathy veterinary practice in 1983, she founded the Academy Of Veterinary Homeopathy and was on the faculty of the National Center for Homeopathy Summer School for ten years.

                Dr. Christina is also an integrative medicine adjunct faculty liaison for the Maryland Veterinary Technician Program and lectures on a wide array of topics including integrating holistic options into veterinary practices, as well as guidance on how to choose the best approaches to heal animals and sustainability.

                Can Extra Fat Affect My Cat’s Health Condition?

                Can Extra Fat Affect My Cat’s Health Condition?

                Answered by Dr. Jeff Feinman

                To any nutritional changes that can affect the health conditions, but how it does and if it does depends on the individual cat. In general things they worry about are fat towards toxins so it’s good to be careful of the kind of fat you feed. 

                Certainly that can increase weight in your kitty cat and the other big concern is too much fat can trigger a cat to symptoms of pancreatitis which is an irritation of one of the organs that can cause vomiting. Doesn’t happen that oftenly in cats, but when it does your best bet is to test them, take them to the vet and make sure everything is okay otherwise and be cautious of how much fat or the balance of any nutrient in the diet. 

                I’m Jeff Feynman from HolisticActions! answering pet parent questions. Thank you for joining me today!

                Suggested Treatments:

                1. Fresh food feeding
                2. Minimizing cooked animal fats
                3. Extra exercise and engagement

                Related Symptoms: 

                1. Visible body condition (or inability to easily feel the spine and backbone of long haired cats)
                2. Slower mobility
                3. Less Jumping 

                 

                DISCLAIMER: Holistic Actions! does not provide advice on certified medical treatments. Content is intended for informational purposes only and to equip you with the tools needed for Holistic Medical Decision Making (HMDM). It is not a substitute for clinical assessment, diagnosis, or treatment. Never use content found on the Holistic Actions! website as the basis for ignoring advice from your veterinarian to seek treatment. If you think you may have a veterinary emergency, please call your vet or an animal hospital immediately.

                 

                Dr. Jeff

                Jeffrey Feinman, BA, VMD, CVH, graduated in 1985 from the University of Pennsylvania and was Penn’s first veterinary dual-degree University Scholar, holding both molecular biology and veterinary degrees. He is the founder of HolisticActions.com and dedicated to pet parent empowerment.

                Dr. Jeff is devoted to researching about how to harness the innate power of the individual using Vitality and Balance. He and his wonderful wife Amy live with Archie, a rescue pup, and a Rex cat named Tigger.