Hyperthyroid cat!

AnneH

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Joined
Feb 3, 2020
Messages
17
My first post, bear with me. Our cat Girly is hyperthyroid, and has had it more than two years, and it has been getting worse. We gave her the herbal Thyroid Support Gold from April 2019 until it ran out early this year, and it may have eased some of her symptoms, but she hated being given the drops, and when it ran out we gave all of us a break and instead of re-ordering, we searched for an alternative, which led us here. We upgraded her diet last fall to freeze-dried raw food (in addition to Girly's preferred canned food), bone broth, and supplements, but Girly is picky, changeable ~ not so happy with freeze-dried raw anymore ~ and sensitive to even a pinch of anything added to her food, and vomits a lot. I watched the Answers webinar, and have been adding a small portion to her freeze-dried raw ~ so far, she will eat the freeze-dried raw much better when it is mixed with the Answers chicken. (Fingers are crossed) I learned from this site that because there are so many homeopathic remedies, a trained professional should evaluate to determine what is best based on her particular symptoms, but I am also being asked to use this forum to glean knowledge to empower me to make my own decisions regarding my cat. I have started keeping a journal. Having written out my cat's history, I wish I had been on top of things earlier, but we are where we are. I am on board with the notion of helping the body to heal itself, and that it can take time, but I'm not sure how much time we have. From 2018 to now, Girly dropped from 10 lbs to 4. I don't know if she'll go completely raw, or organic. Are there generic homeopathic remedies that could get her body more on track quickly? We have so far been resisting giving her Methimazole to get her T4 levels down. Please advise, thank you.
 

Dr. Jeff

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Welcome Anne.:)

Great work with your first post! :thumbsup:

I am off to yoga class right now but will reply later today.

I bet @Dr. Christina and @Dr. Jean also have much to say on this important topic.
 

Dr. Jeff

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Hi again Anne.

My general approach to Girly's hyperthyroidism is based on HMDM (Holistic Medical Decision Making).

Step 1, your goal, will be informed by how much healing is possible for hyperthyroidism.

The great majority of hyperthyroid kitties have a benign "wart" (adenoma) in the thyroid.

The longer the length of time that the hyperthyroidism has been around,, and the size of the nodule, the body is able to reverse this.

My friend and colleague Peter Dobias presented a number of cases treated, and sometimes naturally reversed, just by stimulating the healing ability of the body:


Since Girly has been hyperthyroid for 2 years, it's not likely that her body will be able to fully eliminate the adenoma.

It's important to be realistic, tho cure is still the goal.

Therefore the way you treat going forward can still be informed by what is possible.

My experience is that the goal in situations like yours is to increase her internal vitality and balance as much as possible to allow reduction of the methimazole and prevent development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (heart dis-ease) secondary to the elevated thyroid hormone.

Step 2 of HMDM is to do your research.

This is the easiest step for HA! Academy members such as yourself!

The HA! faculty and resources can help you do any research and provide the holistic to conventional bridge which will help you work with your local vet or any specialists with whom you consult.

Here's some useful and reliable, although purely conventional, information:


You've already started doing this on your own and by your research that led you here.

In addition, the endocrine, thyroid and heart webinar-courses will give you much more info.

When you are logged in at the digital resource part of the site (not the forum), you'll see these areas listed on your member dashboard.

All of the reliable research resources, in addition to the exams and diagnostic test results from your local vet, you will need are there.

As for HMDM Step 3, or implementing your Holistic Action!, you've already started!!

Mixing in raw food with her freeze-dried will increase her body's ability to heal by raising her cellular energy.

As cellular function becomes more efficient, you'll see her quality of life improve.

This is directly reflected by her BEAM symptoms.

Behavior, Energy, Appetite and Mood can also be optimized using another important vitality-raising and balancing method called Pranayama for Pets.

This is an adaptation of the yogic breathing exercises that are research-proven to improve health (in people).


In kitties, the best way to harness the healing power of the breath is to promote purring.

Purring activates healing pathways via the parasympathetic nervous system and is hypothesized to be one of the main mechanisms that help cats live so long (30+ years) and heal so well.

The human version of the purr is called ujjayai breathing.


It is also a form of restricted breathing where the laryngeal muscles are constricted to make a sound like fogging up a mirror (or "purring").

I'll post the references and the full cellular energy and pranayama article which has other tips, when it is published in the next few weeks.
The more you can get her to purr, the better!

Other tools you can use to promote her healing include the snuffle mat and playing the hunt for treats game.

Here's a forum thread that has a video showing my pups enjoying the snuffle mat:


In summary, right now I'd focus on her gaining weight and having a good life using fresh food and her breath.

At the same time continue to monitor her external biomarker symptoms like weight and heart rate as well as her internal symptoms like t4, chemistry and CBC.

Please let me know if I can help further in any way.
 

Dr. Christina

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Joined
Jun 15, 2017
Messages
307
In addition to all the great suggestions given by Dr. Jeff that will make a big difference for Girly, because of the large weight loss and 2 years of you trying different approaches to building her health, I would suggest so begin right away working with a veterinary homeopath. Because some can consult by phone, it is not that important where you live.

Where do you live?

Dr. Christina
 

AnneH

Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2020
Messages
17
Hi again Anne.

My general approach to Girly's hyperthyroidism is based on HMDM (Holistic Medical Decision Making).

Step 1, your goal, will be informed by how much healing is possible for hyperthyroidism.

The great majority of hyperthyroid kitties have a benign "wart" (adenoma) in the thyroid.

The longer the length of time that the hyperthyroidism has been around,, and the size of the nodule, the body is able to reverse this.

My friend and colleague Peter Dobias presented a number of cases treated, and sometimes naturally reversed, just by stimulating the healing ability of the body:


Since Girly has been hyperthyroid for 2 years, it's not likely that her body will be able to fully eliminate the adenoma.

It's important to be realistic, tho cure is still the goal.

Therefore the way you treat going forward can still be informed by what is possible.

My experience is that the goal in situations like yours is to increase her internal vitality and balance as much as possible to allow reduction of the methimazole and prevent development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (heart dis-ease) secondary to the elevated thyroid hormone.

Step 2 of HMDM is to do your research.

This is the easiest step for HA! Academy members such as yourself!

The HA! faculty and resources can help you do any research and provide the holistic to conventional bridge which will help you work with your local vet or any specialists with whom you consult.

Here's some useful and reliable, although purely conventional, information:


You've already started doing this on your own and by your research that led you here.

In addition, the endocrine, thyroid and heart webinar-courses will give you much more info.

When you are logged in at the digital resource part of the site (not the forum), you'll see these areas listed on your member dashboard.

All of the reliable research resources, in addition to the exams and diagnostic test results from your local vet, you will need are there.

As for HMDM Step 3, or implementing your Holistic Action!, you've already started!!

Mixing in raw food with her freeze-dried will increase her body's ability to heal by raising her cellular energy.

As cellular function becomes more efficient, you'll see her quality of life improve.

This is directly reflected by her BEAM symptoms.

Behavior, Energy, Appetite and Mood can also be optimized using another important vitality-raising and balancing method called Pranayama for Pets.

This is an adaptation of the yogic breathing exercises that are research-proven to improve health (in people).


In kitties, the best way to harness the healing power of the breath is to promote purring.

Purring activates healing pathways via the parasympathetic nervous system and is hypothesized to be one of the main mechanisms that help cats live so long (30+ years) and heal so well.

The human version of the purr is called ujjayai breathing.


It is also a form of restricted breathing where the laryngeal muscles are constricted to make a sound like fogging up a mirror (or "purring").

I'll post the references and the full cellular energy and pranayama article which has other tips, when it is published in the next few weeks.
The more you can get her to purr, the better!

Other tools you can use to promote her healing include the snuffle mat and playing the hunt for treats game.

Here's a forum thread that has a video showing my pups enjoying the snuffle mat:


In summary, right now I'd focus on her gaining weight and having a good life using fresh food and her breath.

At the same time continue to monitor her external biomarker symptoms like weight and heart rate as well as her internal symptoms like t4, chemistry and CBC.

Please let me know if I can help further in any way.
Thank you, Dr. Jeff! I have read both of the articles you sent ~ the Nat Mur study got me excited to think there might be hope for Girly. She came to us at ~ 5 yrs with many EWS, but her adenoma was our first sign of hyperthyroid trouble. We were treating Girly for constipation at the time (and for a long time after) and we had her to the vet right after noticing the lump, but the vet decided not to take labs, so we only realized it was likely hyperthyroidism by researching her symptoms. Her first labs were done almost a month ago and show T4 of 12, RBC of 6.43, Hemoglobin 10.2, BUN 50, Potassium 3.5, Na:K ratio 45, ALP 90, Urine protein trace, and Glucose 2+(500 mg/dL). We have not given her any methimazole.
I just watched the inspiring video you sent with Dr. Joe Kellerstein. In it he says that homeopathy can be used alongside allopathic medicine, whereas I was under the impression that we shouldn't combine the two. Dr. Kellerstein and others point out that homeopathy is about individualizing treatment, but the Nat Mur study gave the same pill to all the cats.
Hi again Anne.

My general approach to Girly's hyperthyroidism is based on HMDM (Holistic Medical Decision Making).

Step 1, your goal, will be informed by how much healing is possible for hyperthyroidism.

The great majority of hyperthyroid kitties have a benign "wart" (adenoma) in the thyroid.

The longer the length of time that the hyperthyroidism has been around,, and the size of the nodule, the body is able to reverse this.

My friend and colleague Peter Dobias presented a number of cases treated, and sometimes naturally reversed, just by stimulating the healing ability of the body:


Since Girly has been hyperthyroid for 2 years, it's not likely that her body will be able to fully eliminate the adenoma.

It's important to be realistic, tho cure is still the goal.

Therefore the way you treat going forward can still be informed by what is possible.

My experience is that the goal in situations like yours is to increase her internal vitality and balance as much as possible to allow reduction of the methimazole and prevent development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (heart dis-ease) secondary to the elevated thyroid hormone.

Step 2 of HMDM is to do your research.

This is the easiest step for HA! Academy members such as yourself!

The HA! faculty and resources can help you do any research and provide the holistic to conventional bridge which will help you work with your local vet or any specialists with whom you consult.

Here's some useful and reliable, although purely conventional, information:


You've already started doing this on your own and by your research that led you here.

In addition, the endocrine, thyroid and heart webinar-courses will give you much more info.

When you are logged in at the digital resource part of the site (not the forum), you'll see these areas listed on your member dashboard.

All of the reliable research resources, in addition to the exams and diagnostic test results from your local vet, you will need are there.

As for HMDM Step 3, or implementing your Holistic Action!, you've already started!!

Mixing in raw food with her freeze-dried will increase her body's ability to heal by raising her cellular energy.

As cellular function becomes more efficient, you'll see her quality of life improve.

This is directly reflected by her BEAM symptoms.

Behavior, Energy, Appetite and Mood can also be optimized using another important vitality-raising and balancing method called Pranayama for Pets.

This is an adaptation of the yogic breathing exercises that are research-proven to improve health (in people).


In kitties, the best way to harness the healing power of the breath is to promote purring.

Purring activates healing pathways via the parasympathetic nervous system and is hypothesized to be one of the main mechanisms that help cats live so long (30+ years) and heal so well.

The human version of the purr is called ujjayai breathing.


It is also a form of restricted breathing where the laryngeal muscles are constricted to make a sound like fogging up a mirror (or "purring").

I'll post the references and the full cellular energy and pranayama article which has other tips, when it is published in the next few weeks.
The more you can get her to purr, the better!

Other tools you can use to promote her healing include the snuffle mat and playing the hunt for treats game.

Here's a forum thread that has a video showing my pups enjoying the snuffle mat:


In summary, right now I'd focus on her gaining weight and having a good life using fresh food and her breath.

At the same time continue to monitor her external biomarker symptoms like weight and heart rate as well as her internal symptoms like t4, chemistry and CBC.

Please let me know if I can help further in any way.
Hi again Anne.

My general approach to Girly's hyperthyroidism is based on HMDM (Holistic Medical Decision Making).

Step 1, your goal, will be informed by how much healing is possible for hyperthyroidism.

The great majority of hyperthyroid kitties have a benign "wart" (adenoma) in the thyroid.

The longer the length of time that the hyperthyroidism has been around,, and the size of the nodule, the body is able to reverse this.

My friend and colleague Peter Dobias presented a number of cases treated, and sometimes naturally reversed, just by stimulating the healing ability of the body:


Since Girly has been hyperthyroid for 2 years, it's not likely that her body will be able to fully eliminate the adenoma.

It's important to be realistic, tho cure is still the goal.

Therefore the way you treat going forward can still be informed by what is possible.

My experience is that the goal in situations like yours is to increase her internal vitality and balance as much as possible to allow reduction of the methimazole and prevent development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (heart dis-ease) secondary to the elevated thyroid hormone.

Step 2 of HMDM is to do your research.

This is the easiest step for HA! Academy members such as yourself!

The HA! faculty and resources can help you do any research and provide the holistic to conventional bridge which will help you work with your local vet or any specialists with whom you consult.

Here's some useful and reliable, although purely conventional, information:


You've already started doing this on your own and by your research that led you here.

In addition, the endocrine, thyroid and heart webinar-courses will give you much more info.

When you are logged in at the digital resource part of the site (not the forum), you'll see these areas listed on your member dashboard.

All of the reliable research resources, in addition to the exams and diagnostic test results from your local vet, you will need are there.

As for HMDM Step 3, or implementing your Holistic Action!, you've already started!!

Mixing in raw food with her freeze-dried will increase her body's ability to heal by raising her cellular energy.

As cellular function becomes more efficient, you'll see her quality of life improve.

This is directly reflected by her BEAM symptoms.

Behavior, Energy, Appetite and Mood can also be optimized using another important vitality-raising and balancing method called Pranayama for Pets.

This is an adaptation of the yogic breathing exercises that are research-proven to improve health (in people).


In kitties, the best way to harness the healing power of the breath is to promote purring.

Purring activates healing pathways via the parasympathetic nervous system and is hypothesized to be one of the main mechanisms that help cats live so long (30+ years) and heal so well.

The human version of the purr is called ujjayai breathing.


It is also a form of restricted breathing where the laryngeal muscles are constricted to make a sound like fogging up a mirror (or "purring").

I'll post the references and the full cellular energy and pranayama article which has other tips, when it is published in the next few weeks.
The more you can get her to purr, the better!

Other tools you can use to promote her healing include the snuffle mat and playing the hunt for treats game.

Here's a forum thread that has a video showing my pups enjoying the snuffle mat:


In summary, right now I'd focus on her gaining weight and having a good life using fresh food and her breath.

At the same time continue to monitor her external biomarker symptoms like weight and heart rate as well as her internal symptoms like t4, chemistry and CBC.

Please let me know if I can help further in any way.
Thank you, Dr. Jeff! I have read both of the articles you sent ~ the Nat Mur study got me excited to think there might be hope for Girly. She came to us at ~ 5 yrs with many EWS, but her adenoma was our first sign of hyperthyroid trouble. We were treating Girly for constipation at the time (and for a long time after) and we had her to the vet right after noticing the lump, but the vet decided not to take labs, so we only realized it was likely hyperthyroidism by researching her symptoms. Her first labs were done almost a month ago and show T4 of 12, RBC of 6.43, Hemoglobin 10.2, BUN 50, Potassium 3.5, Na:K ratio 45, ALP 90, Urine protein trace, and Glucose 2+(500 mg/dL). We have not given her any methimazole.

I just watched the inspiring video you sent with Dr. Joe Kellerstein. In it he says that homeopathy can be used alongside allopathic medicine, whereas I was under the impression that we shouldn't combine the two. Dr. Kellerstein and others point out that homeopathy is about individualizing treatment, but the Nat Mur study gave the same pill to all the cats.

I did find out I could order some Nat Mur online, but I decided to get professional guidance first.

Girly's favorite activity (mostly she sleeps) is being thrown treats. She has the loudest purr of any cat I've ever known.
Hi again Anne.

My general approach to Girly's hyperthyroidism is based on HMDM (Holistic Medical Decision Making).

Step 1, your goal, will be informed by how much healing is possible for hyperthyroidism.

The great majority of hyperthyroid kitties have a benign "wart" (adenoma) in the thyroid.

The longer the length of time that the hyperthyroidism has been around,, and the size of the nodule, the body is able to reverse this.

My friend and colleague Peter Dobias presented a number of cases treated, and sometimes naturally reversed, just by stimulating the healing ability of the body:


Since Girly has been hyperthyroid for 2 years, it's not likely that her body will be able to fully eliminate the adenoma.

It's important to be realistic, tho cure is still the goal.

Therefore the way you treat going forward can still be informed by what is possible.

My experience is that the goal in situations like yours is to increase her internal vitality and balance as much as possible to allow reduction of the methimazole and prevent development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (heart dis-ease) secondary to the elevated thyroid hormone.

Step 2 of HMDM is to do your research.

This is the easiest step for HA! Academy members such as yourself!

The HA! faculty and resources can help you do any research and provide the holistic to conventional bridge which will help you work with your local vet or any specialists with whom you consult.

Here's some useful and reliable, although purely conventional, information:


You've already started doing this on your own and by your research that led you here.

In addition, the endocrine, thyroid and heart webinar-courses will give you much more info.

When you are logged in at the digital resource part of the site (not the forum), you'll see these areas listed on your member dashboard.

All of the reliable research resources, in addition to the exams and diagnostic test results from your local vet, you will need are there.

As for HMDM Step 3, or implementing your Holistic Action!, you've already started!!

Mixing in raw food with her freeze-dried will increase her body's ability to heal by raising her cellular energy.

As cellular function becomes more efficient, you'll see her quality of life improve.

This is directly reflected by her BEAM symptoms.

Behavior, Energy, Appetite and Mood can also be optimized using another important vitality-raising and balancing method called Pranayama for Pets.

This is an adaptation of the yogic breathing exercises that are research-proven to improve health (in people).


In kitties, the best way to harness the healing power of the breath is to promote purring.

Purring activates healing pathways via the parasympathetic nervous system and is hypothesized to be one of the main mechanisms that help cats live so long (30+ years) and heal so well.

The human version of the purr is called ujjayai breathing.


It is also a form of restricted breathing where the laryngeal muscles are constricted to make a sound like fogging up a mirror (or "purring").

I'll post the references and the full cellular energy and pranayama article which has other tips, when it is published in the next few weeks.
The more you can get her to purr, the better!

Other tools you can use to promote her healing include the snuffle mat and playing the hunt for treats game.

Here's a forum thread that has a video showing my pups enjoying the snuffle mat:


In summary, right now I'd focus on her gaining weight and having a good life using fresh food and her breath.

At the same time continue to monitor her external biomarker symptoms like weight and heart rate as well as her internal symptoms like t4, chemistry and CBC.

Please let me know if I can help further in any way.
 

AnneH

Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2020
Messages
17
Thank you, Dr. Jeff! I have read both of the articles you sent ~ the Nat Mur study got me excited to think there might be hope for Girly. She came to us at ~ 5 yrs with many EWS, but her adenoma was our first sign of hyperthyroid trouble. We were treating Girly for constipation at the time (and for a long time after) and we had her to the vet right after noticing the lump, but the vet decided not to take labs, so we only realized it was likely hyperthyroidism by researching her symptoms. Her first labs were done almost a month ago and show T4 of 12, RBC of 6.43, Hemoglobin 10.2, BUN 50, Potassium 3.5, Na:K ratio 45, ALP 90, Urine protein trace, and Glucose 2+(500 mg/dL). We have not given her any methimazole.

I just watched the inspiring video you sent with Dr. Joe Kellerstein. In it he says that homeopathy can be used alongside allopathic medicine, whereas I was under the impression that we shouldn't combine the two. Dr. Kellerstein and others point out that homeopathy is about individualizing treatment, but the Nat Mur study gave the same pill to all the cats.

I did find out I could order some Nat Mur online, but I decided to get professional guidance first.

Girly's favorite activity (mostly she sleeps) is being thrown treats.

She has the loudest purr of any cat I've ever known.
 

Dr. Jeff

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You're welcome Anne. ?

Homeopathy and conventional drugs can definitely be used side by side. Even in cancer:


You're right about the need to individualize homeopathic medicines.

Nat mur is NOT right for every cat.

Regarding her constipation, fiber + water are the keys.

Fiber also contains lots of vit B3 that will increase her cellular energy and natural healing.
 

Dr. Jeff

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Wow, how cool Jackie! That would be great if you and Anne got to connect in person.

the Nat Mur study got me excited to think there might be hope for Girly
Anne, one thing we know for sure is where there's life there's hope. ?⚡
 

AnneH

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Hi Jackie! Yes, there is! If you've walked your dogs down by the river, our paths may have crossed!

Anne (2 cats) :)
 

AnneH

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Messages
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Dr. Jeff and Dr. Christina,

I read Dr. Jeff's April 21, 2018 forum post on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and saw the empower hour which talks about the heart seminar (which I will look at tonight). Now I am clearer about whether to give methimazole to our hyperthyroid cat. I had been resistant to it, but have just changed my mind based on her worsening external symptoms, the chance that she may have developed heart issues, and that we do not have a homeopathic vet. I came across Dr. Jeff in searching for one.

I understand that giving Girly the pills can unmask kidney dis-ease, but does it also unmask hypertrophic cardiomyopathy? I don't see proBNP on the labs. Is it considered a mainstream test for allopathic vets? Would it be best to wait to take the proBNP test until after giving her methimazole for awhile?
Also, is a T4 of 12 very high? Does it depend on other factors?

I so appreciate the amazing work you both do to educate people about the health of our animal friends aimed at prevention rather than cure. Yay! This website has been very helpful in making me aware of signs and symptoms to watch out for, about homeopathy in general, and helping me to prepare myself and my cat for treatment.

I would like to find a good homeopathic vet. I can see that Dr. Jeff is committed to his million-person vision :) . Can either of you recommend someone to me?

Thank you so very much,
Sincerely,
Anne
p.s. When I click on the thyroid webinar resource list, I get information about vaccinosis! Please can you post a new link to the thyroid information? Thanks!
 

Dr. Jeff

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You're welcome Anne!

Thanks for pointing out the bum thyroid link. Aruna will fix it in when she works again tomorrow.

No. Methimazole does not unmask HCM.

It works by slowing release of thyroid hormone (t4).

Elevated t4 causes hypertrophy of the cardiac cells with resultant cardiomyopathy (which just means heart muscle dis-ease from stretching).

Lowering t4 with methimazole decreases Girly's heart muscle stretch and myopathy.

ProBNP indirectly measures this and is a commonly run diagnostic test in conventional vet med.

Regarding when you run the test, that would depend.

Is your HMDM Step 1 goal to gather any relevant non-invasive diagnostic data, or is it to save the stress and $100+ cost of the test?

If the former, then do before and after testing.

If the latter, then just do it after methimazole if there is a heart murmur that you'd like to characterize fully with this test and an echocardiogram.

A t4 of 12 is medium-high in my experience. I see numbers like this pretty often and even high teens and 20s are pretty common before treatment.

Regarding working with a homeopath, have you tried Find a Vet – The Academy of Veterinary Homeopathy ?

Also, @dr_ judy herman is adjunct HA! faculty and is taking new clients.


If you don't speak with Dr. Judy and want to discuss other options with me, then please send the info on my new client form and we can then chat a bit:


In addition, if you attend tomorrow 8pm we can talk then.
 

AnneH

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Messages
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Thank you, Dr. Jeff! Very helpful! I would love to able to be on the EH tonight, but unfortunately, Mondays are normally booked for me.

I will send you new client questionnaire asap.

Anne
 

Dr. Jeff

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You're welcome Anne.
 

AnneH

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Yes, Dr. Jeff, I have changed my plans so I'll be there tonight at 8pm thanks
 

AnneH

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Messages
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Questions: about methimazole: is there a best time of day to give it to her, with or without food, how soon might I be noticing changes in external symptoms?

We may already be seeing one:
Her first pill was given to her yesterday evening at 7:30 p.m. This morning, instead of eating her usual approximately 9 oz of a combination of foods, (trying to get raw freeze dried or fermented into her) she refused anything but Purina One, and ate only one can so far today. In context, her primary morning food giver was packing today to go away, a possible stressor for her.

Is it a good idea to give her tuna and other fishes with hyperthyroid?

Are there homeopathic adjuncts to taking methimazole?
Are there homeopathic remedies for fussy eating?
 

AnneH

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Joined
Feb 3, 2020
Messages
17
Before I go out for my bottled water and to check for my homeopathic remedy, here's the present Girly challenge: more vomiting! Yesterday and today the scenario was the same: She eats nearly an entire RAWZ 5.5 oz can in the morning (yesterday had some freeze-dried raw nuggets, but not today) with a bit of psyllium. Yesterday 9 hours later, after sleeping most of that time, she puked up a violent 28" long spew of gruelly brown liquid with a few undigested slivers of chicken, then shortly after defecated. Today 7 1/2 hours later after trying to eat something else a couple of times, being up and down but mostly sleeping, the same vomit, followed by today a very watery pile. Yesterday she did eat a can of Purina One about 3 hours later, then had treats and pieces of cooked organic chicken. Just hoping I can keep enough going down and staying there. When she's throwing up, it is very difficult to give her raw.
 

Dr. Jeff

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Hey Anne-

In order to put Girly's vomiting into context to decide what to do, look at her BEAM.

If it's unchanged, then the isolated symptoms are just that.

Isolated symptoms.

By definition, symptoms come and go.

In addition to BEAM, defining symptoms using the 4 Ps can really help you decide what to do.

They are:

Persistent, Prominent, Problematic and Peculiar symptoms.

The more of the 4 Ps a symptomhas, the more you need to pay attention to it.

For example, if the same vomiting pattern goes on for a dew more days in a row then it would be considered to be persistent.

The stool/diarrhea after vomiting might be peculiar, etc.

In general, if you've recently had an appointment with a vet homeopath, and nothing has changed, the best Holistic Action! is to give the indicated homeopathic medicine you discussed during the consultation.
 

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