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Check dog's teeth who doesn't want to be touched

AnnmarieF

All Access Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2021
Messages
7
hi,
how to do you go about checking a dog's teeth who doesn't want to be touched, I think she has an infected tooth.

Do you have to use anesthesia?

thank you
 

Dr. Jeff

Administrator
Moderator
Veterinarian
Joined
Feb 23, 2017
Messages
3,395
No Annmarie, you don't usually need to anesthetize these guys.

I bet @Dr. Christina and @Dr. Sara have some tips.
 

Dr. Christina

Veterinarian
Joined
Jun 15, 2017
Messages
627
Once this tooth issue is resolved - what is happening now? - it would be good to use positive reinforcement to train your dog to LOVE having the mouth, eyes, ears, feet, etc, examined!
Dr. Christina
 

Dr. Sara

Veterinarian
HA! Faculty
Joined
Dec 30, 2018
Messages
259
Some dogs like to tug, and that can actually be a good way to look at their teeth, if they are focussed enough on tugging that they will allow you to use another toy (not your finger) to push the lips up to look in the mouth. Above all, be safe. If the mouth is uncomfortable, there may be no option aside from sedation. We don't want anyone to get bitten, or the dog to be made painful by harsh manipulations.

It is incredibly important to teach your pets to accept handling of all body parts - though that may be easier said than done. Find something that your pet loves, and pair that with touching near areas that they don't want handled. Note that I said 'near'!

Suppose your dog loves chicken, but hates having the mouth touched. Feed chicken while massaging the nearest part to the mouth that the dog likes having handled. Gradually move closer, ensuring that the dog stays relaxed and eating. A similar approach can be used for handling feet or ears. These sessions must be short - just a minute at the most.
Hope this helps.
Dr. Sara
 

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