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Underweight Golden Retriver on raw diet?

JacquelineN

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Hi, My Golden Retriever, Sophie, 17 months old, seems to be underweight. I’m not sure what her weight is now, last time at the vet she was 65lbs. Though you can see her ribs and she’s quite thin. Her BEAM seems very good to me, though behavior wise, she is eating sticks in out backyard when she’s done with her run and play outside. There are no pesticides on the lawn…she eats Small Batch raw lamb or Turkey, mixed with some Farmina or Canine Caviar kibble. We are trying to transition to less kibble and more raw and or cooked food. I’ve attached a photo. Her mother was also a thinner dog. I don’t want her to be overweight of course, just wondered what if what I’m describing sounds like she needs more fat? Or more food in general? Thank you for your help.

image.jpg
 

JacquelineN

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One more thing to add to the above list that I forgot to share. I mentioned this to Dr Jeff….she has the habit of eating her poop. I understand that there are a variety of reasons but one of them, could be that she’s not getting enough nutrients from what I’ve read. This is Not a new behavior, so while I said that her Beam is good, that behavior is curious to me but now new. I do wonder if it’s related to her needing more food. And also the eating/chewing of sticks. If you have thoughts about this, please let me know. Thank you again….

Thanks again.
 

Dr. Christina

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Great question, Jacqueline


Being lean is fine, especially when she has always been that way and her mom, too.

Definitely continue to eliminate kibble. Keep reading here about feeding a variety of foods, especially whatever you are eating, organ meats, fish, dairy (especially raw goats milk), fermented foods. Do not think making or feeding dog food. Think - what do they eat in the wild and what does their anatomy call for.

Eating stool is one of the signs of internal imbalance, rather than having a specific cause.

Do take the 101 course and read the links to feeding, as well as at the library resource, and listen to our many experts speak about diet. Maybe search this forum for other threads on nutrition and feeding.

If the stick eating is not new - may indicate need for more focused play, learning tricks, etc.

Dr. christina
 

Dr. Jeff

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Her BEAM seems very good to me,
I don’t want her to be overweight of course, just wondered what if what I’m describing sounds like she needs more fat? Or more food in general?
Better for her to have her high BEAMS on than to be "normal" weight with a lower BEAM.

It's also healthier for her to be on the thin side (she'll live longer). And it sounds like her genetic predisposition.

Yes, maybe more organ meats (lots of heart and kidney), more quantity of food, extra snacks fruits, vegetables, eggs, etc.

 

Dr. Jean Hofve

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Definitely keeping her on the lean side is much better for her health and longevity!

But if you want to add weight, add carbohydrates. That's how you trigger insulin, the fat-storing hormone. A bit of sweet potato and other starchy veggies -- organic of course -- will add calories without wrecking the diet. About 10% of her regular diet would probably be plenty.
 

JacquelineN

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Great question, Jacqueline


Being lean is fine, especially when she has always been that way and her mom, too.

Definitely continue to eliminate kibble. Keep reading here about feeding a variety of foods, especially whatever you are eating, organ meats, fish, dairy (especially raw goats milk), fermented foods. Do not think making or feeding dog food. Think - what do they eat in the wild and what does their anatomy call for.

Eating stool is one of the signs of internal imbalance, rather than having a specific cause.

Do take the 101 course and read the links to feeding, as well as at the library resource, and listen to our many experts speak about diet. Maybe search this forum for other threads on nutrition and feeding.

If the stick eating is not new - may indicate need for more focused play, learning tricks, etc.

Dr. christina
Thank you Dr Christina, I’ll look at all of the resources and try to seek help from a homeopathic vet about any imbalance she may have….
 

JacquelineN

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Definitely keeping her on the lean side is much better for her health and longevity!

But if you want to add weight, add carbohydrates. That's how you trigger insulin, the fat-storing hormone. A bit of sweet potato and other starchy veggies -- organic of course -- will add calories without wrecking the diet. About 10% of her regular diet would probably be plenty.
Thank you Dr Hofve: I appreciate the suggestion of sweet potato and adding about 10 percent, as I don’t want to overdo it.
 

JacquelineN

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Better for her to have her high BEAMS on than to be "normal" weight with a lower BEAM.

It's also healthier for her to be on the thin side (she'll live longer). And it sounds like her genetic predisposition.

Yes, maybe more organ meats (lots of heart and kidney), more quantity of food, extra snacks fruits, vegetables, eggs, etc.

Thank you Dr Jeff: I think I’m not measuring BEAM as I should….I’ll look into that. I appreciate the suggestion about the organ meats and the farmhounds site—I’ll definitely add some to her diet.
 

Dr. Jeff

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Here's a bit more about BEAM that may help.
 

Attachments

  • early disease detection using beam score for vets.pdf
    50.6 KB · Views: 2

Dr. Jeff

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YW!
 

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