Spay/Neuter -- Cats

kristen_acri

Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2017
Messages
62
I've been asked this question by a friend and I have no idea what the recommendations are! We talk about this a lot with dogs. What about cats? Harmful to do early? Advantages to waiting?

Thanks!
Kristen
 

Dr. Christina

Veterinarian
Joined
Jun 15, 2017
Messages
255
Same thing, Kristen. Well, mostly.
Love to get @Dr. Sara to chime in.

Female cats are healthy when they keep their ovaries. They come into heat a lot, though, so she may need to learn to help them come out of heat (a glass rod inserted in the vulva is one way). Dr. Jeff's cat is intact. The options are the same as with dogs - take out the uterus and leave the ovaries, or leave both and tie the oviducts.

The urine of most male cats is so strong that people cannot tolerate it. However, I had several clients who said they had 18 year old intact males and had never had a problem.

I would wait with males until there was some odor to urine, then neuter the regular way. Females are up to owner to see if they can manage the heat cycles.

Remember your friend, for free, can read the forum, just not post questions or comments.
 

kristen_acri

Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2017
Messages
62
Thanks for the info!

I went back and listened to some of Dr. Sara's Empower Hour and got some additional detail from it.

Thanks too for the reminder about friends reading the forum..
 

Dr. Sara

Veterinarian
HA! Faculty
Joined
Dec 30, 2018
Messages
79
Queens are much less likely to get pyometra than bitches, so tubal ligation as Dr. Christina describes is a possible option. I would not use tubal ligation for bitches because of the pyometra risk. For bitches, an ovary sparing spay, removing the uterus and cervix, is the appropriate surgery.

Mammary cancer in queens is much more likely to be malignant than mammary cancer in bitches, so that is an important consideration.

For male cats, the urine is strong smelling, and toms do have more desire to roam. Toms are somewhat more likely to mark inside the home as well.

Overall, the benefits of sex hormones in cats have been studied less. Cats, as a group, are more robust than dogs. I would not be surprised if cats without normal sex hormones were found to have a less robust immune system. This may affect the incidence of the common feline old age problems of hyperthyroidism, kidney disease, and diabetes. The obesity problem of cats without hormones also contributes to diabetes incidence.
 

kristen_acri

Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2017
Messages
62
Queens are much less likely to get pyometra than bitches, so tubal ligation as Dr. Christina describes is a possible option. I would not use tubal ligation for bitches because of the pyometra risk. For bitches, an ovary sparing spay, removing the uterus and cervix, is the appropriate surgery.

Mammary cancer in queens is much more likely to be malignant than mammary cancer in bitches, so that is an important consideration.

For male cats, the urine is strong smelling, and toms do have more desire to roam. Toms are somewhat more likely to mark inside the home as well.

Overall, the benefits of sex hormones in cats have been studied less. Cats, as a group, are more robust than dogs. I would not be surprised if cats without normal sex hormones were found to have a less robust immune system. This may affect the incidence of the common feline old age problems of hyperthyroidism, kidney disease, and diabetes. The obesity problem of cats without hormones also contributes to diabetes incidence.
Thank you so much!
 

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