• Your logins to the main site and to this support forum are NOT the same. To get access to this forum, you must be a ALL-ACCESS member (register here). You will receive login information the day you register. If you have problems logging in to the forum, please use the Contact us form. First time posting? Watch this video and Follow this posting guide

Bite wound: stitch or not?

ckraham

All Access Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2018
Messages
69
HI...one of my dogs put a bite on my afghan Friday evening. Have been trying to avoid stitching and cleaning with sea salt water and thieves oil solution, and applying colloidal silver and butadiene several homies a day. Both breeders say don't stitch. Both vets I showed the pictures to, including the holistic vet, said stitch. Any ideas here? I tried to attache the pictures but they came as PDF, not sure how to attach as pictures but can try if these don't come through


The surgery would be tomorrow morning,

Thank you

He had surgery already in January for removing a testicle from his abdomen by the way
 

Attachments

  • bigbird1bite.pdf
    3.3 MB · Views: 7
  • bigbird2bite.pdf
    2.7 MB · Views: 3

Dr. Jeff

Administrator
Moderator
Veterinarian
Joined
Feb 23, 2017
Messages
3,900
I'm sorry to hear about your pup's bite.:confused: What situation provoked the bite?

It looks like you've done a great job with keeping it clean!

But if your goal is to get this gaping wound partially closed (it can't really be fully closed without removal of a section of the skin and deep cleaning/debridement) sooner than later, than a few stitches under a local anesthetic would be fastest.

If you don't mind keeping the wound clean and managing it for a few weeks, then that would work as well (in the ER we used to do that all of the time).
 

ckraham

All Access Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2018
Messages
69
Thank you. Had I not talked to the vets I would have just dealt with keeping it open and clean. But now I got confused. The breeders both say that infection is more likely if it is closed, than open. Confusing. I guess I am looking to do what is best for him. And minimize risks of further issues. Breeder suggested a product called "Cut Heal"which I purchased but it says for minor cuts and scrapes. So am not sure, as it provides a seal/barirer (to me that makes me think bacteria can get sealed in).

That you called it a gaping wound makes me think...sew it up...

It was over a carrot. I was washing my hands and heard the eruption of sounds. Did not see it actually happen, it was fast, I think she bit him and he tried to get away, hence the tear.
 

ckraham

All Access Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2018
Messages
69
I just re read your reply; fast healing is not more important than actual healing for me...if slow and natural healing is relatively risk free if I keep on top of things, it could be better than surgery and inserting a whole bunch of chemicals into his body...? And I heard that closing bite wounds has its risks and could require a drain, etc. I want what is better and less complicated for the dog... cosmetics not as important to me as the dog's health and well being...

Thank you

Cassandra
 

Dr. Sara

Veterinarian
HA! Faculty
Joined
Dec 30, 2018
Messages
309
Dear Cassandra,
I agree with Dr. Jeff. You will get the most cosmetic closure (smallest scar) by suturing the wound closed, though there is some risk of infection. With thorough debridement and cleaning this risk is minimised.
Your Afghan has a coat, so the resultant slightly larger triangular scar from letting it granulate in on its own will not be evident at all. As long as you can keep the wound gently flushed, that is a fine way to handle it, and let it heal slowly from the inside out. Granulation tissue (the pink new tissue in the wound) is quite resistant to infection. Of course, if the wound were to start to develop an odour, ooze, or become inflamed and painful, then you might need further intervention, but this is unlikely.
My own greyhound got several of these wounds at various times when she would run in our woods. I sutured the first one, she had a typical rocky sighthound waking from sedation, and tried to bother the sutures for 2 weeks. I decided to let future wounds granulate in. Less upsetting for all of us, though you could see wee chevron shaped scars on her.
I use oral Calendula and Hypericum homeopathic medicines to help decrease pain and stimulate healing of wounds.
Cheers,
Dr. Sara
 

Weekly Digest

Weekly Digest
Subscribe/Unsubscribe

Staff online

Members online

Latest posts

Top Bottom