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Skin issue: Growth on the left paw

ViktoriiaP

All Access Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2022
Messages
9
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Hi! My dog is a black lab, Toby, who is going to be 4 years old in July. I noticed this growth (please see pic) on his left paw that is growing. On the picture, the farther left one is 2020, 2nd is 2021, and 3rd one is 2022. Do you know what can it be? It doesn’t seem to bother him at all, but it’s there and obviously growing. Appreciate all the help!
 

Dr. Christina

Veterinarian
Joined
Jun 15, 2017
Messages
724
Good for you, Viktoria, for not just having it cut off right away. From a homeopathic and holistic perspective, growths on the skin are often the underlying imbalance pushing to the outside where they are not causing harm.

Because it is growing, certainly try all the basic keys to health you read about in the 101 course - Non member login - Holistic Actions!. Review the early warning signs of internal imbalance, start a journal and keep taking photos yearly.

Next, try some of the many energy techniques we discuss in the forum, site and Empower Hour webinars. The newest may be the best for "growths" - Bengston method - Get his book and start treating it yourself after measuring it exactly.

Dr. Christina
 

Dr. Jeff

Administrator
Moderator
Veterinarian
Joined
Feb 23, 2017
Messages
3,820
Hello Viktoriia!

What does your vet say?

Do you recall if the timing of the recent growth of the growth? Did anything change for the weeks/months prior?
Do you know what can it be?

Without histopathology (which is done if the growth is removed) it's impossible to say for sure. It could be anything from a warty benign growth to a basal cell tumor.

Did his BEAM change at all when this recently started getting bigger?
 

Dr. Sara

Veterinarian
HA! Faculty
Joined
Dec 30, 2018
Messages
298
Dear Viktoriia,
As Dr. Christina and Dr. Jeff point out, there are many possible tumor types for this growth on the front of your dog's elbow. We see skin masses, or tumors, in many dogs. Both benign (non-cancerous) tumors and malignant (cancerous) tumors are more common in dogs on a kibble (dry food) diet, dogs with metabolic disease, elderly dogs, and breeds with a genetic susceptibility to skin tumors. There is also an increased incidence of tumors at or near sites on the body where vaccinations were given, or where circulation is restricted. These predilections make a lot of sense when we consider that, according to both homeopathic and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) principles, the skin is the body’s way to eliminate the products of internal imbalance. That is why so many disease processes have skin signs. This is good for the body, as it is a way to eliminate toxic products without overburdening internal metabolic pathways. When we suppress these outward signs, by lopping off tumors, or suppressing rashes with steroids, we eliminate this valuable path for the body, stress internal metabolic pathways, and increase internal disease.

As the tumor is in the elbow bend, and your dog's harness lies above the tumor, be sure that your dog is not wearing the harness in the house, as that will decrease circulation to the area. As the tumor is near the elbow, the motion of the elbow may be banging it, which can also increase tumor size.

No one can say for certain if a mass is benign or malignant without histopathology. Sometimes a sample by cytology (fine needle aspirate of the tumor) will give useful information. This tumor is not growing quickly, though it is certainly growing. A vet would want to examine it closely. Tumors are more likely to be benign if they are smooth (this appears to be), not connected deeply to underlying tissues (it dangles, so it may not be deeply connected), soft, and have intact skin over them. Danger signs of possible malignancy are rapid growth, ulceration, size greater than 1 cm, dark pigmentation of the skin of a light skinned dog, connection to deep tissues, and irregular edges.

Please consult with your holistic vet to determine if further investigations are warranted. In the meantime, provide optimal diet and energy support, and eliminate any physical causes that may be traumatising the site, such as excessive harness wearing.
Best regards,
Dr. Sara
 

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