Homeopathy vs herbs: herbs, mushrooms overload system?

ckraham

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Oct 23, 2018
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I have a dog who has both cystinuria and, according to ultrasound done in June, a small mass on the spleen. He has been treated by a holistic vet and also now a homeopathic vet. Homeopathic vet has taken him off of most of his supplements (mushrooms, biosuperfood (blue green algae/spirulina) and Chinese herbs(strong liver detox, we just stopped it, yunnan baiyo, and crystal stone formula, to dissolve crystals and all stones), as per muscle testing with a muscle testing machine. My dog is, thank god, doing very well, but I am nervous about stopping the herbs that prevent reformation of stones. I understand that doing too many things can confuse the body and I definitely want to keep the spleen happy, but am edgy about dropping the stone former for so long. Any thoughts appreciated. Has anyone worked with a muscle testing machine? Versus muscle testing with the body. Thank you. This dog started with Phosphorous, then went to Thuja 1M, and will next receive Silicea 1M in a month. He has no symptoms other than sometimes licks one side of his groin and has developed staph infection on his skin there that we are not trying to suppress
 

Dr. Jeff

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Hi Cassandra-

Great that you are working with a vet homeopath!

Yes, many vet homeopaths prefer to avoid supplements as they can both decrease the energy needed to heal in addition to confusing the body regarding curing the underlying energetic imbalance.

Your decision about whether to continue any supplements is a personal one that needs to be based on the degree of your nervousness.

Supplements primarily work pharmacologically as natural drugs?rather than energetically.⚡

However, the Chinese herbs can do both which is why most homeopaths prefer not to use both at once.

Perhaps you can talk to your pup's homeopath about other ways to support healthy bladder and kidney function like increasing fluid intake to prevent stone formation.

Also, it almost sounds like the homeopathy is being guided by a "protocol" rather than individualized.

For example, without obvious symptoms, how do you know that the next month's homeopathic medicine is Silica?

Lastly, you may have been told after the June ultrasound, that most splenic nodules are benign regenerative nodules and not a worry (tho still worth monitoring).

It's easy to monitor blood cell count every month or two in addition to annual ultrasounds to look closely for potential problems.

It's even easier to monitor urine every few weeks to months to check for concentration, pH and the presence of crystals.

All of these can be early warning signs prior to stone formation.?

Also, @Dr. Christina or @Dr. Sara may have other advice regarding working with your vet care team.
 

ckraham

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Oct 23, 2018
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Thank you Dr Jeff. Splenic nodules can be regenerative? That is hopeful news. I know liver ones can, but didn't know about splenic ones. Yes, we are going on symptoms (of which he has not many), and I do ultra hydration, exercise (male intact dog needs exercise/walks to inspire complete emptying of bladder, ha), ph strips, diet to make urine alkaline...I have researched most of it myself. I also check the specific gravity and keep it at about .10 or .05, and occasionally strain urine to check for grit.

Maybe repeating the ultrasound is worthwhile. Hs bloodwork has come back into normal range (liver enzymes were slightly elevated for two years).

Are mushrooms considered a supplement or a food?

Thank you,
Cassandra
 

Dr. Jeff

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Yes, many splenic nodules are regenerative.

Here's what the surgical specialist vets say:

Splenic hematoma and nodular hyperplasia are the most common non-cancerous lesions found in the spleen and account for 20–41% of all splenic lesions. They are benign nodules/masses of clotted blood.
In my experience, it's even higher in many breeds.

Great job with the urine monitoring!

Mushrooms can be considered both as supplements and foods depending on the form and dose (higher dose mushrooms mixed with other nutrients are supplement-like).

Most of them can be considered to be foods.
 

Dr. Christina

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At the recent Natural Products Expo I spoke with several staff of Host Defense and will be trying one of their products soon for me. I will be transcribing an interview soon and one of their educators will be speaking with us in the future about mushrooms.

How mushrooms are grown commercially both affects the nutritional and herbal benefits as well as the environmental footprint. They grow it on organic rice so they can use the rice, the mycelium that are growing in the rice, and the fruiting body (the mushroom looking part) in their powders.

Most others harvest only the fruiting body and discard the substrate and mycelium (many for compost or other reuses).

Dr. Christina
 

kristen_acri

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I was going to pose a question about Chinese herbs, single and blends, but this thread seems to answer my question. Charlie has his first conventional vet appointment soon. I had to find a new vet because the one I used has stopped practicing to stay home with her family. That vet had prescribed some Chinese herbs for Reyah but using them would have interfered with her remedy. The new vet also has training in TCM. I think I'll note any herbal recommendations but not purchase them right away.

Does this make sense?

Thanks!

Kristen
 

Dr. Jeff

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Yes!

Please let us know what your new vet says about Charlie (in addition to his adorableness). ?
 

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