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7 yo BMD with Arthritis

tsharlo1

All Access Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2017
Messages
51
Buxton is a 7yo intact male BMD. He has been raw fed his entire life and rabies is the only vaccine he has had. At 2 yo OFA X-rays were done and showed grade 2 elbow with DJD and FCP. He has not had any issues with that elbow until recently. He has had Trixsyn and green lipped mussel for several years. He is active going on the trails with me as well as obedience and scent work training. I am retired so he is not inactive at home all day.
In addition to homeopathy with Dr. Jeff I am looking for comments on other supports I can do at home. Wondering about the differences and what would be best for arthritis.......PEMF, red light therapy, or ?? He does not swim and underwater treadmill is cost prohibitive on a regular basis. Shorten walks but maybe more often? We used to walk 3 miles a day but that aggravates his arthritis too much now. Switch from Trixsyn to Adequan? He has chiropractic and massage about every 6-8 weeks.
Thank you.
Debbie
@Dr.Sara
 
Last edited:

Dr. Jeff

Administrator
Moderator
Veterinarian
Joined
Feb 23, 2017
Messages
3,395
Sorry to just now see this post. My answers tho may not be very helpful as they would be the same ones we discussed on our last call about him.

In short, yes to PEMF (use the Assisi up to 4 times/day) + the great red light pad that @Dr. Sara mentioned and which is discussed a bit elsewhere on the forum.

Big yes to more frequent short sniff walks!

Yes, do a 4-6 week trial of Adequan instead of (or in addition to) the Trixsyn HA (hyaluronic acid).

Also, here's an older article with other suggestions:

 

Dr. Sara

Veterinarian
HA! Faculty
Joined
Dec 30, 2018
Messages
259
Dear Debbie,
I have been out of town, so I am just seeing this as well.
I send my clients a short document discussing various options, pasted below; I hope it is helpful.
Stay well,
Dr. Sara

Holistic Treatment for Joint Discomfort and Arthritis
S.F. Chapman DVM, VetMFHom
Joint injuries and osteoarthritis are probably the most common musculoskeletal problems in our animals. We can minimize the risk of our animals incurring injuries, and keep them active and flexible lifelong, with excellent nutrition, sensible conditioning, and appropriate environmental management.

I do not use conventional anti-inflammatories for muscle and tendon injuries. They decrease inflammation by suppressing the body’s natural healing mechanisms. This does decrease pain and inflammation, but it also encourages the individual to over use the affected body part before it is actually healed. In addition, many conventional analgesics and anti-inflammatories have significant potential side effects. Homeopathic medicines stimulate healing, and thereby decrease pain and inflammation, so when an animal that is receiving homeopathic medicines feels better, they actually are better. Constitutional treatment for the whole patient is ideal for chronic arthritic conditions. Symptomatic homeopathic treatment can be helpful for acute injuries or flare ups of chronic conditions.

For acute joint sprains and strains, I initially use Arnica and Ruta, substituting Rhus tox for Ruta if the patient limbers up and feels better after moving around. I decrease the frequency of administration as the patient improves. A 30 C potency is initially given once or twice a day, a low potency (6x, 6C, or 12X) may be given up to 3 or 4 times daily when the injury is painful. These can be prepared in liquid form for easier and more effective dosing.

Many elderly dogs, and even some cats, have decreased proprioception in their hind limbs. This is caused by pressure from the arthritis on the tiny proprioceptive fibers which ‘tell’ the animal when their legs are in the normal position. When these fibers are not working properly, animals are more likely to let their legs slide out on smooth surfaces, or stumble on uneven surfaces because they do not realise their paw is turned under. A good video showing normal proprioception is:
Any slowing in flipping the paw back over is abnormal.
Excellent footing helps animals with proprioceptive problems, as it is harder to slip on rough surfaces. It can also help to apply a traction product to the paw pads, like Paw Friction, or put non-slip booties on the patient.

Veterinary treatments that speed healing are acupuncture and physical therapy. Acupuncture improves circulation and decreases pain, and can be repeated as desired. Acupuncture can also help improve the function of the tiny proprioceptive fibers.
Sports medicine practices can provide rehabilitation and physical therapy programs, with stretches and exercises for home use. Chiropractic manipulation may help when joints are not in proper alignment.

Supplements ensure that adequate nutrients are present for joint repair. I list some helpful supplements and their doses below. Please check that these are appropriate for your individual patient and ask your practitioner about dose before starting them.

Vitamin E (d alpha tocopherol = natural vitamin E), Anti-oxidant.

CBD oil or extract as recommended by manufacturer. Be sure that the product is tested for purity and activity and third party verified. Decreases inflammation, enhances mood, calming.

Omega 3 fatty acids (fish oil tested for purity), Decreases inflammation, improves cardiac health

S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe, must be taken on an empty stomach), Detoxifies free radicals, regenerates intracellular glutathione, enhances mood.

Curcumin, dose proportional to human dose; Anti-inflammatory, anti-neoplastic, improves neuron and liver health.

Glycosaminoglycans: glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, Protect and regenerate cartilage, mild anti-inflammatory. New Zealand green lipped mussel is a good source.

Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), Antioxidant

Many arthritic dogs are already receiving chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM. Always check the dose by weight, as many supplements do not provide much of the active ingredients. Glucosamine, choindroitin, and MSM act synergistically, providing a greater benefit when they are all given together.

It is a good idea to start supplements one at a time. This way you can see what is helping, and ensure that the pet does not have an over reaction to too many supplements!
CBD products provide the quickest relief from pain. Broad spectrum CBD (cannabinoids) have the THC removed, so they are legal and non-toxic. There is a lot of information on the company websites. Then add in chondroitin, then vitamin E, then fish oil, then curcumin, then, if there is still noticeable stiffness or lameness, SAM-e.

Except for the SAM-e, all of the other supplements can be given with meals. I use human products for most of these in my dogs, though there are some good pet products out there. Sometimes it is hard to find pet products that don’t have a lot of other ingredients or flavorings, and pet products are not tested for quality and potency as rigorously as human products. Products with the NASC certification do receive more testing, so are often a good choice. I research brands that I am interested in on line, as it is difficult to read the tiny print on the labels. I do like CannaPet and Bluebird Botanicals CBD, Carlson’s vitamin E, Barlean’s fish oil, and Source Naturals and Doctor’s Best SAM-e. I have used a lot of different glucosamine / chondroitin / MSM brands. With large dogs it can be difficult to find pet products with enough active components for their weight.

I suggest curcumin for older dogs, or those that have had a cancerous tumour removed. Curcumin from turmeric is known to decrease the growth of cancerous cells, and it is quite safe. It also decreases inflammation. There is a lot of information on line about curcumin. The dose for a dog is roughly proportional to that for people, with human doses based on a 120# person. Most dogs – and some cats! – love golden paste, given proportional to weight; the Dogs Naturally website has a good recipe for ‘Turmeric Golden Paste’.

Avoid feeding kibble. All kibble is extruded, a high heat and pressure process that destroys nutrients and produces pro-inflammatory substances. Many dogs eat kibble and appear to do well on it, but I have seen incredible improvements in dogs with chronic problems when they stop eating highly processed kibble. Few human foods (some pastas and cereals) are extruded like kibble; the process was developed to increase the length of time animal food could be stored when there were metal shortages in World War II. Human food for long term storage without cans, like MREs and astronaut food, are freeze-dried or dehydrated, which retains a lot more nutrients and doesn’t create the free radicals that increase inflammation.

The diets that I prefer are complete and balanced ground raw diets, but not everyone is comfortable with feeding raw. Freeze-dried or dehydrated raw or canned diets are good choices, provided that they are excellent quality. Some of the newer dry diets are cold pressed, and this gentler processing retains more nutrients and produces fewer free radicals, making them a better choice than extruded kibble. ’The Whole Dog Journal’ has discussions of various foods, and the on-line Dog Food Advisor also rates foods for quality.

There are other things that you can do at home to help your companion’s joint comfort:

I like animals to use orthopedic pet beds, but dogs certainly have varying opinions about them. Cats generally are into comfort! Many furry dogs prefer to sprawl on bare floors, and some dogs don’t seem to want anything to do with beds. If your dog likes beds, an orthopedic one is a good choice, though it can take some dogs a bit of time to get used to the feel of the foam. I suggest lounging in it with the dog!

Massage is helpful, provided the animal likes it. Gently massage areas with a smooth, gentle kneading, starting above the sore or stiff area, and ending below it. Some dogs, and many cats, only want very light pressure; less pressure is better than too much. Massage is relaxing, and has the added benefit that you will notice changes in your pet’s body. As mentioned above sports medicine vets can provide further guidance on physical therapy and stretching exercises.

Gentle range of motion stretches while lying are safe for most patients. Standing stretches can make patients with proprioceptive problems too unsteady, and we don't want them to fall. Slowly and gently extend each leg forward and back; only go as far as is comfortable, and hold for the count of three at the point of greatest comfortable extension in each direction. Do the same by flexing each leg toward the body, always ensuring that the patient is comfortable.

Acupressure will help sore pets; it works similarly to acupuncture in stimulating energy flow through the body. Dr. Schwartz’s book “Four Paws, Five Directions” gives step by step instructions with diagrams, and a discussion of food therapy to help conditions.

Essential oils may also help soreness. The best source that I have found for essential oils is AnimalEO. Their products are tested for quality, safety, and purity.

Red light therapy uses light to stimulate healing. A company that makes high quality, reasonably priced products for dogs, cats, and horses is Canine Light Therapy at: According to "Gospel"...Equine Light Therapy®-Canine Light TherapyWelcome to Affordable Light Therapy for Horses and Dogs!
The Assisi Loop uses a electromagnetic field to stimulate healing. It is more expensive, though it may provide additional benefit.
 

tsharlo1

All Access Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2017
Messages
51
Sorry to just now see this post. My answers tho may not be very helpful as they would be the same ones we discussed on our last call about him.

In short, yes to PEMF (use the Assisi up to 4 times/day) + the great red light pad that @Dr. Sara mentioned and which is discussed a bit elsewhere on the forum.

Big yes to more frequent short sniff walks!

Yes, do a 4-6 week trial of Adequan instead of (or in addition to) the Trixsyn HA (hyaluronic acid).

Also, here's an older article with other suggestions:

Thank you for your comments and additional information.
Debbie
 

tsharlo1

All Access Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2017
Messages
51
Dear Debbie,
I have been out of town, so I am just seeing this as well.
I send my clients a short document discussing various options, pasted below; I hope it is helpful.
Stay well,
Dr. Sara

Holistic Treatment for Joint Discomfort and Arthritis
S.F. Chapman DVM, VetMFHom
Joint injuries and osteoarthritis are probably the most common musculoskeletal problems in our animals. We can minimize the risk of our animals incurring injuries, and keep them active and flexible lifelong, with excellent nutrition, sensible conditioning, and appropriate environmental management.

I do not use conventional anti-inflammatories for muscle and tendon injuries. They decrease inflammation by suppressing the body’s natural healing mechanisms. This does decrease pain and inflammation, but it also encourages the individual to over use the affected body part before it is actually healed. In addition, many conventional analgesics and anti-inflammatories have significant potential side effects. Homeopathic medicines stimulate healing, and thereby decrease pain and inflammation, so when an animal that is receiving homeopathic medicines feels better, they actually are better. Constitutional treatment for the whole patient is ideal for chronic arthritic conditions. Symptomatic homeopathic treatment can be helpful for acute injuries or flare ups of chronic conditions.

For acute joint sprains and strains, I initially use Arnica and Ruta, substituting Rhus tox for Ruta if the patient limbers up and feels better after moving around. I decrease the frequency of administration as the patient improves. A 30 C potency is initially given once or twice a day, a low potency (6x, 6C, or 12X) may be given up to 3 or 4 times daily when the injury is painful. These can be prepared in liquid form for easier and more effective dosing.

Many elderly dogs, and even some cats, have decreased proprioception in their hind limbs. This is caused by pressure from the arthritis on the tiny proprioceptive fibers which ‘tell’ the animal when their legs are in the normal position. When these fibers are not working properly, animals are more likely to let their legs slide out on smooth surfaces, or stumble on uneven surfaces because they do not realise their paw is turned under. A good video showing normal proprioception is:
Any slowing in flipping the paw back over is abnormal.
Excellent footing helps animals with proprioceptive problems, as it is harder to slip on rough surfaces. It can also help to apply a traction product to the paw pads, like Paw Friction, or put non-slip booties on the patient.

Veterinary treatments that speed healing are acupuncture and physical therapy. Acupuncture improves circulation and decreases pain, and can be repeated as desired. Acupuncture can also help improve the function of the tiny proprioceptive fibers.
Sports medicine practices can provide rehabilitation and physical therapy programs, with stretches and exercises for home use. Chiropractic manipulation may help when joints are not in proper alignment.

Supplements ensure that adequate nutrients are present for joint repair. I list some helpful supplements and their doses below. Please check that these are appropriate for your individual patient and ask your practitioner about dose before starting them.

Vitamin E (d alpha tocopherol = natural vitamin E), Anti-oxidant.

CBD oil or extract as recommended by manufacturer. Be sure that the product is tested for purity and activity and third party verified. Decreases inflammation, enhances mood, calming.

Omega 3 fatty acids (fish oil tested for purity), Decreases inflammation, improves cardiac health

S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe, must be taken on an empty stomach), Detoxifies free radicals, regenerates intracellular glutathione, enhances mood.

Curcumin, dose proportional to human dose; Anti-inflammatory, anti-neoplastic, improves neuron and liver health.

Glycosaminoglycans: glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, Protect and regenerate cartilage, mild anti-inflammatory. New Zealand green lipped mussel is a good source.

Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), Antioxidant

Many arthritic dogs are already receiving chondroitin, glucosamine, and MSM. Always check the dose by weight, as many supplements do not provide much of the active ingredients. Glucosamine, choindroitin, and MSM act synergistically, providing a greater benefit when they are all given together.

It is a good idea to start supplements one at a time. This way you can see what is helping, and ensure that the pet does not have an over reaction to too many supplements!
CBD products provide the quickest relief from pain. Broad spectrum CBD (cannabinoids) have the THC removed, so they are legal and non-toxic. There is a lot of information on the company websites. Then add in chondroitin, then vitamin E, then fish oil, then curcumin, then, if there is still noticeable stiffness or lameness, SAM-e.

Except for the SAM-e, all of the other supplements can be given with meals. I use human products for most of these in my dogs, though there are some good pet products out there. Sometimes it is hard to find pet products that don’t have a lot of other ingredients or flavorings, and pet products are not tested for quality and potency as rigorously as human products. Products with the NASC certification do receive more testing, so are often a good choice. I research brands that I am interested in on line, as it is difficult to read the tiny print on the labels. I do like CannaPet and Bluebird Botanicals CBD, Carlson’s vitamin E, Barlean’s fish oil, and Source Naturals and Doctor’s Best SAM-e. I have used a lot of different glucosamine / chondroitin / MSM brands. With large dogs it can be difficult to find pet products with enough active components for their weight.

I suggest curcumin for older dogs, or those that have had a cancerous tumour removed. Curcumin from turmeric is known to decrease the growth of cancerous cells, and it is quite safe. It also decreases inflammation. There is a lot of information on line about curcumin. The dose for a dog is roughly proportional to that for people, with human doses based on a 120# person. Most dogs – and some cats! – love golden paste, given proportional to weight; the Dogs Naturally website has a good recipe for ‘Turmeric Golden Paste’.

Avoid feeding kibble. All kibble is extruded, a high heat and pressure process that destroys nutrients and produces pro-inflammatory substances. Many dogs eat kibble and appear to do well on it, but I have seen incredible improvements in dogs with chronic problems when they stop eating highly processed kibble. Few human foods (some pastas and cereals) are extruded like kibble; the process was developed to increase the length of time animal food could be stored when there were metal shortages in World War II. Human food for long term storage without cans, like MREs and astronaut food, are freeze-dried or dehydrated, which retains a lot more nutrients and doesn’t create the free radicals that increase inflammation.

The diets that I prefer are complete and balanced ground raw diets, but not everyone is comfortable with feeding raw. Freeze-dried or dehydrated raw or canned diets are good choices, provided that they are excellent quality. Some of the newer dry diets are cold pressed, and this gentler processing retains more nutrients and produces fewer free radicals, making them a better choice than extruded kibble. ’The Whole Dog Journal’ has discussions of various foods, and the on-line Dog Food Advisor also rates foods for quality.

There are other things that you can do at home to help your companion’s joint comfort:

I like animals to use orthopedic pet beds, but dogs certainly have varying opinions about them. Cats generally are into comfort! Many furry dogs prefer to sprawl on bare floors, and some dogs don’t seem to want anything to do with beds. If your dog likes beds, an orthopedic one is a good choice, though it can take some dogs a bit of time to get used to the feel of the foam. I suggest lounging in it with the dog!

Massage is helpful, provided the animal likes it. Gently massage areas with a smooth, gentle kneading, starting above the sore or stiff area, and ending below it. Some dogs, and many cats, only want very light pressure; less pressure is better than too much. Massage is relaxing, and has the added benefit that you will notice changes in your pet’s body. As mentioned above sports medicine vets can provide further guidance on physical therapy and stretching exercises.

Gentle range of motion stretches while lying are safe for most patients. Standing stretches can make patients with proprioceptive problems too unsteady, and we don't want them to fall. Slowly and gently extend each leg forward and back; only go as far as is comfortable, and hold for the count of three at the point of greatest comfortable extension in each direction. Do the same by flexing each leg toward the body, always ensuring that the patient is comfortable.

Acupressure will help sore pets; it works similarly to acupuncture in stimulating energy flow through the body. Dr. Schwartz’s book “Four Paws, Five Directions” gives step by step instructions with diagrams, and a discussion of food therapy to help conditions.

Essential oils may also help soreness. The best source that I have found for essential oils is AnimalEO. Their products are tested for quality, safety, and purity.

Red light therapy uses light to stimulate healing. A company that makes high quality, reasonably priced products for dogs, cats, and horses is Canine Light Therapy at: According to "Gospel"...Equine Light Therapy®-Canine Light TherapyWelcome to Affordable Light Therapy for Horses and Dogs!
The Assisi Loop uses a electromagnetic field to stimulate healing. It is more expensive, though it may provide additional benefit.
Thank you Dr. Sara
 

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